Working with a Teacher Link Fellow, an Iredell-Statesville teacher and her students used an auger to dig a hole for a soil sample and laid the soil on the tray to observe different features. The class repeated the experiment several times to demonstrate the differences in the soil in a small area.

Working with a Teacher Link Fellow, an Iredell-Statesville teacher and her students used an auger to dig a hole for a soil sample and laid the soil on the tray to observe different features. The class repeated the experiment several times to demonstrate the differences in the soil in a small area.

Recognizing that teachers typically don’t have time to reach out to the professional scientific and engineering community and that North Carolina has a wealth of untapped resources in its working and retired professionals in science, mathematics, and technology, the SMT Center created the Teacher Link Program (TLP). The Teacher Link Program paired scientists and engineers with K-8 classroom teachers enrolled in a NSF-funded grant to improve science education in North Carolina. The scientists and engineers – Teacher Link Fellows – answered questions from teachers or students, made classroom visits, provided demonstrations for science night events or served as judges for science fairs.

The NSF-funded grant has concluded but the SMT Center wants to hear from scientists or engineers that are interested in supporting K-12 science, technology, engineering or mathematics education. Drop us an email if you are an interested scientist or engineer.

The SMT Center’s partner in the grant was the Center for Inquiry-Based Learning (CIBL). CIBL provided to 9,600 teachers in 25 school districts in-depth professional development on inquiry-based science and the use of science curriculum kits, as well as the science kits and complete refurbishment of the kits. CIBL continues to provide educators with inquiry-based science materials aligned to current standards, full-service science kit management and professional development to effectively teach current science standards.